Read the two research articles provided to you. One article will be a mixed-meth

Read the two research articles provided to you. One article will be a mixed-meth

Read the two research articles provided to you. One article will be a mixed-methods research example and the other will be an action research example. Write a critique on one of the articles. Five sections have been identified: An introduction, a review of the literature, method, findings, and conclusions. * Please keep your writing concise by including the required element for each section.

Read “Academic Discourse and PBL” from Edutopia. Watch video sections 6 and 7 of

Read “Academic Discourse and PBL” from Edutopia. Watch video sections 6 and 7 of

Read “Academic Discourse and PBL” from Edutopia. Watch video sections 6 and 7 of “Topic C: Offering Intensive Supports Using Pull-Out Lessons” from Educational Impact in this week’s Learning Activities folder. Respond to the following in a minimum of 175 words: How does the teacher differentiate their instruction between the lower-level English learners and the upper-level English learners? How does the teacher model and guide academic discourse and academic language? Provide examples. How does the teacher have the students apply the vocabulary words they are discussing? Provide examples. https://www.edutopia.org/blog/sammamish-6-academic-discourse-PBL-danielle-lynch

Instructions: In a presentation to your mentor and key faculty members of your s

Instructions: In a presentation to your mentor and key faculty members of your s

Instructions: In a presentation to your mentor and key faculty members of your school you will present 3 types of program evaluation. Your presentation should provide an overview of the specific model. Detail the application and implementation of each model. Explain the conditions under which it should be used. Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the specific model. Develop a chart that compares and contrasts each model. This should be your last slide.
*Please use the following Program Evaluations: Formative Evaluation, Performance Evaluation, and Summative Evaluation*

One key to success in working with students struggling with literacy skills is p

One key to success in working with students struggling with literacy skills is p

One key to success in working with students struggling with literacy skills is providing instructional support outside of the classroom. These supports are often most useful when families are involved in the literacy development process and provided support strategies and resources, as well as progress updates.
Create an infographic to share with families and students that provides resources in assisting students with literacy development in your content area. The communication should be clear, use family-friendly language, and specify the following:
A family-friendly explanation of what literacy is, the literacy components, and why it is important in your content area.
Describe one research-based strategy or resource that is appropriate for practicing each literacy skill (reading, writing, and speaking/listening) and supports the student in your content area outside the classroom.
One method students and/or parents can use to assess students’ progress and growth in content area literacy outside the classroom.
Describe the strategies you will use to communicate student progress in the classroom to the student and parent/guardian/families.
Support the assignment with 3-5 scholarly resources.

Many students struggle academically across content areas because they are perfor

Many students struggle academically across content areas because they are perfor

Many students struggle academically across content areas because they are performing below grade level in reading/literacy. The ability to assess students, analyze assessment data, and work with parents/guardians and other stakeholders to develop specific intervention plans is critical in helping all students achieve their academic goals. Clearly communicating information about student skills and proposed interventions to all stakeholders can ensure collaboration in the development and implementation of a reading intervention plan.
Reading Case Study: 10th grade male
Student: 10th grade male
English is the student’s first language.
The student has a 504 Plan for ADD.
Lexile level = 970-1030.
The student struggles with comprehending what was read and currently performs approximately two grade levels below grade level.
The student’s fluency lags slightly and is approximately a year below grade level.
The student tries hard despite attention challenges, and he is motivated to learn.
The student actively participates in class but speaks out of turn.
The student is very social and has a lot of friends.
The student enjoys playing soccer and is in the school choir.
Using the Reading Case Study data provided above, develop a 500–750 word intervention plan specific to your content area to support the student with literacy in your classroom. In the plan, address the following:
Identification of state content area standards that align with the student’s learning needs and can be used to support literacy development in the content area.
Creation of three literacy performance objectives for the student to meet, within the context of the identified state standards that align to the specific content area.
Identification of at least one technology-based application or program that will help the student build literacy skills in the content area and a rationale for how the use of the tool will benefit the student.
Selection of three interventions to help the student progress toward meeting the selected content area standards and literacy performance objectives. Include a rationale for the use of each intervention.
Identification of three progress monitoring/summative assessments that could be used to document and monitor student progress. At least one online tool should be included. Describe how each will be used, including implementation frequency.
Support the communication with 3-5 scholarly resources.

Must be based on Thinking Algebraically and Geometric Concepts STATE STANDARDS-

Must be based on Thinking Algebraically and Geometric Concepts
STATE STANDARDS-

Must be based on Thinking Algebraically and Geometric Concepts
STATE STANDARDS- https://www.doe.virginia.gov/teaching-learning-assessment/instruction
NATIONAL STANDARDS- https://www.nctm.org/Standards-and-Positions/Principles-and-Standards/
INTASC STANDARDS- https://ccsso.org/sites/default/files/2017-12/2013_INTASC_Learning_Progressions_for_Teachers.pdf
Important Info

The order was placed through a short procedure (customer skipped some order details).
Please clarify some paper details before starting to work on the order.

Type of paper and subject
Number of sources and formatting style
Type of service (writing, rewriting, etc)

Effective instruction takes practice and continued adjustment from the teacher.

Effective instruction takes practice and continued adjustment from the teacher.

Effective instruction takes practice and continued adjustment from the teacher. Each time a lesson is taught, a teacher learns something new about effective teaching practices through self-reflection, especially when implementing multiple content areas in one lesson for cross-disciplinary instruction. Continuing to practice and receive feedback from other experienced teachers is an important part of a teacher’s professional practice.
Allocate at least 5 hours in the field to support this field experience.
Part 1: Literacy Activity Implementation
For this field experience, deliver the literacy activity you created with your mentor in Topic 3, or a lesson of your mentor’s choice, to the whole class or a small group of students that your mentor has selected. Remember to focus on:
Instructional strategies for literacy development.
Differentiation, including accommodations to meet the diverse needs of students.
Creating engagement and promoting discussion.
If possible, implement the activity with multiple class periods or groups. After each implementation, meet with your mentor and reflect on any adjustments you may need to make before working with the next group.
Part 2: Mentor Feedback
After your implementation, ask your mentor the following:
How effectively did I integrate literacy into the activity?
Were students engaged?
How effectively did I meet the needs of all students?
What did I do well and what can I do better?
Use any remaining field experience hours to assist the mentor in providing instruction and support to the class.
Part 3: Personal Reflection
Write a reflection in 500-750 words summarizing your implementation experience, mentor’s feedback, and your reflection. Address the following in your reflection:
How did I integrate literacy into the activity?
How did I know if the students met the learning objective of the activity?
How did I differentiate by using resources and/or technology to make necessary accommodations in the activity?
What do I feel went well in the class and what might have gone better?
What adjustments were made between implementations or need to be made before the activity is implemented with another group of students?
What would my next steps be for working with the group or groups of students?
APA format is not required, but solid academic writing is expected.

Read chapters 3 and 4 in Fiore, D. J. School-Community Relations, Fifth Edition.

Read chapters 3 and 4 in Fiore, D. J. School-Community Relations, Fifth Edition.

Read chapters 3 and 4 in Fiore, D. J. School-Community Relations, Fifth Edition. 1. Describe a recent public information event or news event that happened in your district or one that involved your school. 2. From your perspective, were the details of the event effectively communicated to the school’s staff and community? 3. Was the communication inclusive in terms of outreach toward community members from multiple backgrounds (e.g., racial, ethnic, cultural, linguistic, sexual orientation)? Why or why not?

Experience plans write two experience plans that support mathematical learning.

Experience plans
write two experience plans that support mathematical learning.

Experience plans
write two experience plans that support mathematical learning.
Choose a different age group for each plan, selecting from infants, toddlers, preschoolers,
Foundation year, Year 1, or Year 2. If you are enrolled in the early childhood degree program, it is
expected that you will write two plans choosing from infants, toddlers, and preschoolers.